Are Snow Plows Bad For Trucks?

Plowing looks like one of those things that can ruin a truck.

Digging into snow and then pushing it into large banks… now that requires some give.

But is it actually as bad as it seems?

Yes, they are

Absolutely, running a plow on your truck will make its parts wear out quicker, but so does anything else you may use the thing for, like towing!

Pickups are designed for work, so even though a plow will put a strain on it, that’s just the way the things go.

A better question would be, “is my truck suitable enough for plowing?”. Now let me get this straight – any truck can plow snow, even a Tundra if you had one; that being said, it all depends on how much of it you’re trying to do…

If you just want to clean up your driveway every now and then, sure, the pickup truck you already have can be all that’s needed. Want to make a business out of it? A 3/4 ton is generally a minimum to get started.

It’s just that bigger trucks can do more work – push more heavier, deeper snow. That’s the name of the game.

What damage does snow plowing do to trucks?

As I see it, most wear is done to the transmission and suspension parts.

The transmission takes a beating because of the constant shifting from drive to reverse, especially so if you do it wrong. The suspension? Well, the hefty front end load of the snow plow is what does a number on it over time.

But we also shouldn’t forget about other often overlooked points, like the frame rusting and general body damage.

The rust comes from the constant exposure to salt, particularly so if you’ll be applying it with a spreader yourself.

The truck’s body gets dinged up by day to day jobs, going from site to site, you name it.


This gig is definitely not of the prettiest for a pickup truck, but hey, if you are up for the task to get it done, I’m not going to be in your way to make that decision.

But before you get to any of that, I’d suggest watching this video by The Fast Lane Truck on more intricacies of this deal.

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